Eight must-see gardens in the North East

The North East is full of breathtaking views and exquisite locations. Here are some of our favourite Gardens in the area that are a pleasure to visit, no matter what the season.

The Alnwick Garden, Northumberland:

A beautiful contrived garden both in and out of season with something for visitors of all ages to enjoy throughout the year. Unique attractions like the poison garden, bamboo maze and the magnificent water features bring people from all over the UK to the garden. Alnwick Garden is currently hosting their Halloween event which runs until October 31, closely followed by their winter wonderland spectacular in the run-up to Christmas.

Credit: www.sky-drone.co.uk
Credit: Elly McCue
Credit: Elly McCue

Washington Old Hall

Washington Old Hall is a picturesque manor house in the centre of Washington village. The manor house provides a direct link to first American president George Washington as it’s where his ancestors took the family surname. Old Hall has been under the care of the National Trust since 1956 and its peaceful, well-kept gardens and café ensure a good day out.

Credit: April Goulden
Credit: Tabby Peverley

Kirkley Hall Zoological Gardens, Ponteland

Surrounding the 17th century Grade II listed mansion are the zoological gardens, full of wondrous creatures to bring delight to visitors of all ages. The estate demonstrates a fantastic way to have a fun-filled day with woodland walks, gardens, farm, play area for children and a café for the adults. Kirkley Hall is also the region’s main centre for a variety of short and long-term agricultural and horticultural courses.

Credit: Jennifer Costello
Credit: Jennifer Costello
Credit: Rachel Johnston

Gibside, Gateshead

The tranquil Georgian garden has 600 acres of riverside and woodland walks. The National Trust site offers a welcome escape from the boisterous boom of city life and dogs are welcome as long as they are kept on leads. Take part in Gibside‘s pumpkin trail from now until Saturday, November 4 from 11am-3pm daily.

Credit: Tabitha Gardner
Credit: Tabitha Gardner
Credit: Rachel Whitley

Saltwell Park, Gateshead

This 55-acre park, which was listed in the top 10 in the UK,  is located in Gateshead and has lots to offer to its visitors all year round. The Victorian park, designed by Edward Kemp, opened in 1876 and was hailed “The People’s Park”. It boasts a four-acre boating lake, a woodland island, Grade II Saltwell Towers and a yew-tree maze to name but a few attractions. Saltwell Park is also home to three war memorials and was the first North East site to link with the British Legion Field of Remembrance.

Credit: @megickmogwai on Instagram
Credit: @megickmogwai on Instagram
Credit: @megickmogwai on Instagram

Whalton Manor Garden, Morpeth

Although the smallest garden on this list at just three acres, Whalton Manor creates a stunning atmosphere that is overflowing with natural beauty and inspiring architecture. Due to its size, the garden is not open to the public and can only be visited by appointment, making the 90-minute tour one to be treasured. With features such as pergolas, a stone-paved courtyard and game larder it is no wonder that Whalton Manor Garden is one of the North East’s most sought-after wedding venues.

Credit: Judith Douthwaite

Bradley Gardens, Wylam

The 19th century walled garden, situated just 9 miles from the city centre, has become a hidden gem. Over the course of 160 years, it has seen many owners and also some neglect. In 2013, it was sold again and pulled by the roots into the 21st century. When visiting the Bradley Gardens in 2018 you can expect to do some upmarket shopping and eat spectacular food while feeling you are in a secret oasis.

Credit: Eleanor Forsyth
Credit: Eleanor Forsyth
Credit: Eleanor Forsyth
Credit: Helen Hutchinson

Belsay Hall, Castle and Gardens, Northumberland

Like many places on our list, there is far more than just a garden to Belsay Hall. The estate comprises of a 14th-century castle, an 18th-century hall and remarkably vast garden between the two buildings. Sir Charles Mannock, who was responsible for the building of the hall, also contributed largely to the ‘wild’ look of the garden which was created in the remains of the quarry. Belsay Hall is host to an array of events and continues the festive spirit in December.

Credit: @holly_may___ on Instagram
Credit: @holly_may___ on Instagram
Credit: @holly_may___ on Instagram
Credit: @hethakat_art on Instagram

To find out additional information about these gardens click on the links throughout the article or interact with the map below.

 

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